1. The Hawaii House approved a bill on Monday that bans so-called “conversion therapy” from being inflicted on LGBTQ youth. In March, the State Senate passed SB 270, with only one Senator voting against it. After conference committee, the proposed act will go to Governor David Ige for signature. Similar laws have been passed in a number of states, including New York, New Mexico, California, and Nevada.

2. A ruling by a Texas judge could provide grounds for the legal protection of LGBTQ workers. According to the Dallas Morning News, Judge Lee Rosenthal, chief Judge of the Southern District Court of Texas in Houston, ruled in favor of engineer Nicole Wittmer. Wittmer alleged that energy corporation Phillips 66 declined to hire her because she is transgender. Rosenthal ruled that Wittmer did not provide adequate proof of her claim. The News related: “But if she had proof, the judge added, Wittmer would have had cause to sue under federal law.” This finding opens the door for a possible future case which could earn transgender persons equal protection under the law.

3. Minneapolis students will now be free to use their preferred gender and name on district forms. An informal policy, enacted in 2013, stated that teachers and school staff should use the preferred name and gender of transgender students. According to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, the change “was made over spring break but took effect Monday when students arrived back at school.”

4. South Euclid, a suburb of Cleveland, approved a measure on Monday that would shield the LGBTQ community from discrimination. The City Council passed the measure by a vote of 9-4. The ordinance blocks prejudicial action in employment, public accommodations and housing. The suburb is the 20th municipality in Ohio to pass such a measure.

5. VIDEO OF THE DAY: “Time For Love,” a video by BBC Scotland’s “The Social,” addresses how modern society pressures LGBTQ couples to withhold public displays of affection.

One Response

  1. Hank Drake

    Correction: There are only seven members of the South Euclid city council. Ordinance 12-17, the anti-discrimination ordinance, passed 7-0. An earlier committee meeting voted to remove an overly broad religious exemption from the language, 5-2.

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