LGBT-related programming is picking up at the Center for Civil and Human Rights, as it hosts an Oct. 3 panel on “LGBT Rights in the USA and Across the Globe.”

Remarks will be made at this Friday’s event by Atlanta sister city Mayor Hon. Dr. Ulrigh Maly of Nuremberg, Germany, then lesbian former Atlanta City Councilwoman Cathy Woolard will moderate a panel that includes:

  • Kasha Nabagesera, LGBT activist and recipient of the International Human Rights Award
  • Michael Adee, Ph. D., Global Faith & Justice Project, Horizons Foundation
  • Tanya Washington, Associate Professor of Law, Georgia State University College of Law
Ugandan LGBT rights activist Kasha Nabagesera, appearing at the Center for Civil and Human Rights Oct. 3. (photo via Facebook)

Ugandan LGBT rights activist Kasha Nabagesera, appearing at the Center for Civil and Human Rights Oct. 3. (photo via Facebook)

Nabagasera comes in all the way from Uganda, where she has been one of the leading voices on LGBT rights since the late 1990’s. The country gained infamy last year when a bill was proposed that would have given the death penalty to gay people—gaining the nickname the “Kill The Gays” bill. The death penalty was later dropped from the bill but it was passed by the Ugandan Parliament with a penalty of life in prison.

The Center opened in June with a grand opening that included remarks from Rep. John Lewis, Mayor Kasim Reed, former Mayor Shirley Franklin and more dignitaries.

Jason Collins, the first openly gay player in NBA history, was a panelist at last month’s event on “Athletes & Social Responsiblity.”

LGBT Rights in the USA and Across the Globe
Friday, Oct. 3 from 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Center for Civil and Human Rights
Cost: $25 for students and members, $50 general admission, $65 includes 1-year admission to The Center
http://www.civilandhumanrights.org/events/event/lgbt-rights-in-the-usa

2 Responses

  1. richard heid

    The Center is a wonderful place, but I was very disappointed that the introductory video to the Human Rights section, “What are human rights?” listed many groups who deserve human rights: Jews, Christians, Muslims,basketball players, rappers, garbage collectors, and others, but not lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, or transgender people.

    With lgbt being legally discriminated agains in Georgia and other parts of the US, this is a gross oversight.

    I have reached out to several contacts at the Center, but have received no response.

    Reply

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