Film

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‘Stonewall Uprising’ explores turning point in LGBT history

“Before Stonewall” ended with the Stonewall Riots. “After Stonewall” began with them. Those documentaries from 1984 and 1999 respectively were reissued in a two-DVD set for Pride Month.

“Stonewall Uprising” sounds like it might have been called “During Stonewall,” but an opening title reveals the scarcity of photos and film footage of the actual events. Instead the new documentary uses reenactments and generic materials from the period, in addition to interviews with those involved.

Based in part on David Carter’s book “Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution” (with Carter helping vet the interviewees), “Stonewall Uprising” is mostly a variation on “Before Stonewall.” Except for a brief introduction the June 28, 1969, raid that triggers the riots doesn’t occur until 50 minutes into the film. The last half-hour is about the raid, the riots and the aftermath.

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‘Flash’ back to gay past

Memory Flash

In August 1969, a screening of Andy Warhol’s homoerotic “Lonesome Cowboys” was screened at the former Ansley Mall Mini Cinema.

Police stopped the film, confiscated the property and arrested the theater manager. They also took photographs of the some 70 people attending as they exited the theater, saying they were looking for “known homosexuals.”

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Emotional ‘Watercolors’

Watercolors movie

Out on Film hosts an exclusive screening of the award-winning movie “Watercolors” March 24 at the Ansley Park Playhouse. This will be the only screening of the film in Atlanta, according to Out on Film Director Jim Farmer.

The organization, which hosts an LGBT film festival in Atlanta each October, is expanding its format from the annual festival to hosting screenings throughout the year.
“Our goal is going to be to do these year-round. This one is going to be really special because we have the writer/director of ‘Watercolors,’ David Oliveras, flying in from Los Angeles for this,” Farmer says.

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Brothers and Sisters

"Prodigal Sons” is the story of three siblings, once brothers but now two brothers and a sister, who return to their Helena, Mont., home for the 20-year high school reunion of two of them. Kimberly Reed, born Paul McKerrow, brings along her lesbian partner, Claire Jones, and a camera crew.

Now in her early forties, Reed has transitioned from man to woman, high school quarterback to filmmaker, Montanan to San Franciscan (where she spent 10 years, arriving as Paul and leaving as Kim) to New Yorker, straight man to lesbian.