Culture

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‘Stonewall Uprising’ explores turning point in LGBT history

“Before Stonewall” ended with the Stonewall Riots. “After Stonewall” began with them. Those documentaries from 1984 and 1999 respectively were reissued in a two-DVD set for Pride Month.

“Stonewall Uprising” sounds like it might have been called “During Stonewall,” but an opening title reveals the scarcity of photos and film footage of the actual events. Instead the new documentary uses reenactments and generic materials from the period, in addition to interviews with those involved.

Based in part on David Carter’s book “Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution” (with Carter helping vet the interviewees), “Stonewall Uprising” is mostly a variation on “Before Stonewall.” Except for a brief introduction the June 28, 1969, raid that triggers the riots doesn’t occur until 50 minutes into the film. The last half-hour is about the raid, the riots and the aftermath.

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Christian singer Jennifer Knapp comes out, goes secular

Former Christian singer Jennifer Knapp

Jennifer Knapp, a Grammy nominated, Dove Award winning Christian recording star, has just released “Letting Go” – her first recording in nine years. She is currently touring and will be a performer on the 2010 Lilith Fair tour at shows in St. Louis and Kansas City, Missouri.

Knapp recently talked with the Georgia Voice about her former career as a Christian performer, her seven-year hiatus in Australia and her return to the music scene as an out lesbian.

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Foxy Brown at Outwrite

Actress Pam Grier will sign copies of her new book Foxy: My Life in Three Acts tonight at Outwrite

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‘Mama Deb’ finds happy ending to grim fairy tales

Debi Lowry is already a bit of a legend in gay Atlanta: a fixture on dance floors and at charitable fundraisers, a surrogate mother to the dozens of gay men who affectionately know her as Mama Deb. As much as Lowry revels in her popularity and being able to offer a compassionate shoulder to those who feel turned away from their biological families, she was unsatisfied by the thought of her legacy being limited to her being a social butterfly.

“When I’m gone, when I die, I want to have had an impact on someone else’s life — I don’t want it to be just, ‘Oh, she was a really nice person’ or ‘She made me laugh,’” Lowry says. “If I can change their lives for the better, I absolutely have to do that.”