Culture

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David Sedaris at Cobb Energy

Gay humorist and author brings hit biting wit to the Cobb Energy Centre tonight to celebrate the release of his new book

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Jogging my “Memory Flash”

Memory Flash

Last April, Georgia Voice and the John Q Collective collaborated on “Memory Flash,” an interactive, multimedia art walk through several of Atlanta's gay history landmarks.

I photographed the event and several hundred shots later, my work was finished. I was satisfied with my contribution, but nothing could have brought it all together quite like experiencing the living catalogue the event produced, which is now on display at Atlanta's Museum of Contemporary Art.

You'll have to read more about it here and here, but the scope of the project reminded me of the power of history in our movement.

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Out on Film continues

Tonight's line-up features documentaries, lesbian drama and a film by Atlanta filmmakers

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Out on Film: Festival celebrates LGBT culture on the big screen

‘Ella Undone’ will screen at the 2010 Out on Film festival

One way to get ready for Pride is a week of total immersion in LGBT cinema. Fortunately, Out on Film offers that opportunity from Oct. 1-7 at two venues, the Landmark Midtown Art Cinemas (LMAC) and the Ansley Park Playhouse (APP).

With 31 features, four programs of shorts and other events, you’ll be able to visit exotic locations (Rio, Buenos Aires, Peru, Nassau, 19th–century England) or spend endless hours in New York bars. Nine of the features are documentaries — and the doc is “in” these days — but fictional films offer a dose of the reality of homophobia in the Bahamas, the Marines and other places.

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Pride: Plenty of options for dining near Piedmont Park

Festival food

Showing Pride can make you hungry. If you’re from out of town, you’ll see there are hundreds of places to eat in the Atlanta metro area. As a native Atlantan, here are some good choices around the periphery of Piedmont Park. Food snobs may not agree, but if you’re hungry at Pride, listen to me.

Some festival food carts at Pride are really delicious but not the healthiest and prices can be high. My weakness is corn dogs dipped in jalapeño cornmeal batter and fried in front of you. Yum. There are also those fried mushrooms and onion blossoms.

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True Colors explores life of bisexual blues legend

‘Gut Bucket Blues’ examines the life of unapologetic early blues icon Bessie Smith

The lives of two music legends come to Atlanta stages this week in two new productions, one directed by a gay man and the other starring a gay actor.

The warts and all life story of blues singer Bessie Smith is presented in True Color’s world premiere production of “Gut Bucket Blues.”

Smith was regarded as the most famous female blues singer of the ’20s and ’30s, but her life was anything but straightforward.   The musical is directed by former Atlantan David H. Bell, who served as the associate artistic director under Kenny Leon for a number of years at the Alliance Theatre.

The openly gay Bell says he has long been a fan of the singer, but his research gave him a new appreciation.  He had been working on a Bessie Smith show for a while when Leon called him about collaborating — and the musical became a reality. Bell left the Alliance roughly around the time Leon did. The two had formed a great partnership and always vowed to work together again.