TV

Theater: Sleepy Hollow

For a theater company that is not used to producing outside of the summer, Serenbe Playhouse is offering a doozy of a fall time show. Gay artistic director Brian Crowdus has just opened his “The Sleepy Hollow E...

New LGBT TV programming down from last year

This time last year, Hollywood – as well as the LGBT community – was all abuzz about the lofty number of LGBT programs that were coming to network TV. It was a record high.

A year later, that bubble has been burst. Most of those high-profile shows are now gone, having fallen one by one. CBS’s “Partners” with Michael Urie was canceled quickly. “The New Normal” lasted a little longer but still bit the dust at NBC, which also canned the acclaimed “Go On,” with Julie White in a supporting role as a lesbian.

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‘Biggest Loser’ trainer visits Atlanta to help ‘Maximize Your Life’

Jillian Michaels comes to Atlanta

Jillian Michaels is best known for her role as a tough but empowering trainer on the NBC hit “The Biggest Loser.” With her first live tour, she hopes to help others find success not just through losing weight, but also through “maximizing” their passions and potential.

Michaels, who just released her newest book, “Slim for Life: My Insider Secrets to Simple, Fast, and Lasting Weight Loss,” comes to Atlanta this month for her “Maximize Your Life” tour, which stops in 35 cities in the U.S. and Canada.

The tour will cover topics ranging from weight loss and workouts to increasing confidence and self-esteem, and Michaels knows of which she speaks.

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Why do we love Rachel Maddow? Let us count some ways

Rachel Maddow

Rachel Maddow, who makes lesbians across the nation swoon, is coming to Atlanta to promote and read from her book “Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power,” now out in paperback.

Praise the goddess of wonky worship.

The political pundit who has her own show on MSNBC — the first openly gay person to have a prime-time news program — has reached in and put a string of lights around our hearts. (Good lesbians who have seen “Desert Hearts” should know this reference.)

Who else can explain the ins and outs of the sequester in a way that makes us cock our heads to one side and lean forward to listen (and perhaps stare at that sexy mole on her neck)?

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‘The Secret Agent’ shows this weekend at Conant Performing Arts Center

The Secret Agent

When Capitol City Opera presents its world premiere “The Secret Agent” this weekend, it does so with an openly gay cast member at its core – Chase Davidson.

An adaptation of the 1907 Joseph Conrad novel, “The Secret Agent” is set in 1930s London. It has a film noir flavor with espionage, secret agents, murder and betrayal. Davidson stars as Stevie, who is autistic and becomes the show’s tragic hero.

“Stevie is the only innocent character in the whole opera,” Davidson says. “He is passed off as an idiot.”

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LGBT resort Maui Sunseeker featured on tonight’s ‘Hotel Impossible’

Maui Sunseeker Resort

Anthony Melchiorri, host of the Travel Channel's “Hotel Impossible,” recently traveled to Hawaii to help save the island state's largest gay-owned and operated resort, the Maui Sunseeker.

Chuck Spence, owner of the resort, worked with Melchiorri and designer Blanche Garcia on creating a marketing strategy as well as renovations.

“It was eye opening for all involved in this show, for us from a business perspective and for the cast when they discovered the clothing optional hot tub,” Spence said of the experience.

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[Video] Eagle attorney appears on Discovery Channel’s ‘What Destroyed the Hindenburg?’

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Most people in Atlanta and elsewhere know Dan Grossman as the dogged attorney who fought City Hall — and won.

When the Atlanta Eagle, a Midtown gay bar, was raided in 2009 by the Atlanta Police Department, Grossman was the only attorney willing to represent the patrons of the bar and sue the city in federal court for constitutional right violations because the patron were detained and searched without cause. Grossman won — several times — and the city paid out millions to settle the lawsuits.