Editorials

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Guest editorial: Basketball and bi-phobia

To some in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer communities, Sheryl Swoopes is a “lie-sexual.”

Swoopes — the three-time Olympic gold medalist and three-time MVP of the Women’s National Basketball Association — is just another sister-girl on the “down low” announcing the incredulous news that she’s now engaged to marry a man.

To incurable homophobes, especially of the fundamentalist Christian variety who pedal their rhetoric that homosexuality is curable with reparative theories, Swoopes is the prodigal daughter who has finally found her way away from homosexuality and home to Jesus.

To many of my heterosexual African -merican brothers, Chris Unclesho, the man Swoopes is engaged to marry, is the man! A bona fide “dyke whisperer” who has turned Swoopes out to the sexual joys of what it is to be with a man.

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Guest Editorial: Why the LGBT community must engage in the reapportionment process

Beginning on Aug. 15, the Georgia General Assembly will hold a special session to redraw congressional and legislative district boundaries. This process, known as reapportionment, happens after each national census.

Because Georgia is one of several southern states that must adhere to the Voting Rights Act, there is always a greater level of scrutiny over our process and the final rulings on district boundaries are usually made by a panel of judges.

This year district boundaries for all legislative and congressional seats will be redrawn. While there will be no change in the number of state legislative seats (236), due to population growth, Georgia will gain one additional Congressional seat.

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Time for Obama to evolve

It’s been painful to watch various White House spokespeople over the past week twist themselves into knots trying to explain President Obama’s flip-flop on marriage equality.

In 1996, while running for a seat in the Illinois state Senate, Obama stated in a written questionnaire that he supports same-sex marriage. Obama wrote, “I favor legalizing same-sex marriages, and would fight efforts to prohibit such marriages.”

That infamous questionnaire has haunted him ever since and re-emerged recently as a series of spokespeople tried to minimize its importance.

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How do we define ‘openly gay elected official’?

If a gay politician comes out but many gay leaders never hear about it, is he really out?

In the last two weeks, Georgia’s gay political landscape got its own version of that oft-quoted question: If a tree falls in the forest and nobody hears it, does it make a sound?

Within days, our state’s short list of known openly gay elected officials jumped by two. Any way you look at it, that’s progress.

But the ensuing reaction raised interesting questions about what it means to be “out,” especially in metro Atlanta in 2011, where gay people are more mainstream than ever, but many still fear discrimination both within their families and the community at large.

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Star’s recent tweets could make me regret coming out as a country music fan

Country musician Blake Shelton

Confession: I love country music. Perhaps it’s the Cash gene in me or simply because I grew up in the Deep South with a mother who carried a torch for Hank Williams (senior not junior — what a disappointment he is) until the day she died.

I think Vince Gill, Brad Paisley, Garth Brooks, Trisha Yearwood and Little Big Town are among the most talented beings on the planet. Note I did not include Taylor Swift in that group. As an amateur musician, I often find myself drawn as much to Willie Nelson songs as to those of The Beatles and The Eagles.

Coming out as a country music fan has had its challenges. I have been ridiculed by friends and family alike for my subversive leanings. It’s just how I’m made, I explain, it’s in my DNA and there’s no denying it. They accept this without question about my sexual orientation, but they are not so forgiving when it comes to my passion for country music.