Editorials

article placeholder

Guest Editorial: Obama’s next step on gay rights

With the midterm elections over, we now move full-tilt into 2012 campaign mode. The coming months will bring answers to tantalizing questions, like whether Sarah Palin will run for president (most likely) and whether President Obama will replace Joe Biden on the ticket with Hillary Clinton (less likely).

More critical is the question of whether Obama will face competition from within his own party or from a third-party candidate like Michael Bloomberg.

Make no mistake that Bloomberg is considering a run. He has campaigned for moderates from both parties and is involved with the new organization No Labels, which seeks to unite moderate Republicans and Democrats. No Labels describes itself as a “citizens movement” aimed at overcoming “the tyranny of hyper-partisanship.”

A challenge from Bloomberg could siphon votes from the Republican nominee as well, but Obama has the most to lose in a three-way race. Bloomberg, a former Democrat who switched to the GOP only to switch again to become an independent, holds many progressive views, including support of same-sex marriage.

article placeholder

Roy Barnes no dream but Nathan Deal a nightmare

To hear former Gov. Roy Barnes at the Oct. 25 LGBT Democratic fundraiser, Tuesday’s election is the most important in Georgia “since World War II.”

While that might be a bit exaggerated, it is hard to overstate the importance of this year’s state elections to LGBT Georgians — although that is not what Barnes and the other Democratic Party leaders and candidates who spoke at the fundraiser were talking about, since they managed to stand at a microphone at an LGBT event and not say the words “gay” or “sexual orientation” one single time.

article placeholder

Pride should be a means, not an end

We had just finished hanging the last banner on the GA Voice booth at Atlanta Pride on Friday afternoon when a small voice spoke up.

“Can I take one of these?”

I looked around the side of the tent to see her pointing at the rack of newspapers in front of our table. She was young, a little shy, just starting to sport a baby dyke look with her short dreadlocks and baggy shorts.

Of course, we said. So she took the paper, but lingered.

“This is my first Pride.”

article placeholder

Guest Editorial: Long transformation of the black church

Humility does not come easy to those who believe they are imitating Christ, especially a megachurch pastor whose promotion of his righteousness has netted millions in profits.

Last Sunday, New Birth Bishop Eddie Long vainly tried to be humble during his first public comments on the sex scandal years in the making, replacing the fiery oration that has made him one of the most powerful men in Atlanta with a labored meekness designed to perfect his role as David versus Goliath in his fight against the four teenage boys who have accused him of seducing them.

article placeholder

Editorial: Why we have ‘two Prides’

The conversation comes up every year, but this time it seems even more distasteful.

As Labor Day nears, it never fails that some Atlantans start questioning the need for one of the city’s largest events over the holiday: Black Gay Pride.

“Why do they want to be segregated?” these white gay people ask. “Why do we have two Prides?”