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OutSports wraps up LGBT medal winners in London Olympics

Seimone Augustus

More than 40 percent of the out LGBT Olympians took home medals, a better medal-winning percentage than Team USA.

OutSports.com, a website dedicated to LGBT issues in sports, provided in-depth coverage of the Olympics, including tallying 23 out Olympians from around the world.

"If Team Gay was a country, it would have finished 31st overall with seven medals, tied with Mexico, Ethiopia and Georgia," OutSports.com co-founder Cyd Zeigler noted in an excellent article wrapping up the London Games.

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Gay and gold

OutSports wraps up LGBT medal winners in London Olympics

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Breaking the barriers: F to M transgender student athletes

Editor's note: This article was originally published in The Mount Holyoke News and was re-published with permission. To read the original article, click here.

When Kye Allums became the first transgender man to play women’s NCAA Division I basketball this November, the selection spotlighted the controversy surrounding transgender athletes. George Washington University’s official statement about Kye led to multiple news stories and raised questions about existing policies for transgender student-athletes. Currently, most high school and collegiate athletic programs are unprepared regarding appropriate pronouns, locker room etiquette and hormone treatments; the Transgender Law and Policy Institute found that only approximately 300 of 4,000 universities include gender status in their anti-bullying rules. Although NCAA policies prohibit keeping statistics about the amount of transgender student-athletes, the issue is not uncommon.

“[This] is not a new issue, but it’s an issue that’s becoming more and more comfortable to bring up. Even just coming out as trans is easier than it was 10 years ago,” says Merric, who began her career at Smith College as a woman but after coming out as a man spring semester of freshmen year, changed his name from Meredith.