Film Stars Don't Die In Liverpool

Quality LGBT-centric film releases kick off 2018

Even though the great wave of LGBT films from 2017 has passed, both the upcoming Atlanta Jewish Film Festival and the new movie “Film Stars Don’t Live in Liverpool” offer up fare that LGBT audiences should gobb...
article placeholder

Atlanta Jewish Film Festival offers extensive gay track

Atlanta Jewish Film Festival

The Atlanta Jewish Film Festival, the city’s largest film festival as well as the second most attended festival of its kind in the world, kicks off Jan. 30 with an impressive LGBT track. Tickets are on sale now, and some screenings are already sold out.

The 13th annual festival runs through Feb.20. In all, more than 70 films will be shown over a three week period. Opening night this year will be held at the Cobb Energy Centre with the crowd-pleasing “Hava Nagila (The Movie).”

Subsequent screenings take place all over the city, including the Regal Cinemas Atlantic Station Stadium 16, Lefont Sandy Springs, Georgia Theatre Company Merchants Walk, Regal Cinema’s North Point Market 8 and the United Artists Tara Cinemas 4.

article placeholder

Jewish Film Festival includes LGBT flicks

Atlanta Jewish Film Festival

A number of LGBT movies, including two screwball farces and an acclaimed documentary about a bisexual author, highlight the annual Atlanta Jewish Film Festival, which kicks off next week.

Established in 2000, the festival has grown to become not just the largest film festival in the city but the second biggest Jewish film festival in the country. The offerings for the 12th annual event, set for Feb. 8-29, are typically broad and plentiful.

More than 70 films will be shown over the three week period and screenings take place all over the city, including the Fox Theatre, Regal Cinemas Atlantic Station Stadium 16, Lefont Sandy Springs, Georgia Theatre Company Merchants Walk and new venues at United Artists Tara Cinemas 4 and United Artists North Point Market 8.

article placeholder

Jewish Film Festival offers plenty for gay audiences

2011 Atlanta Jewish Film Festival offers plenty of LGBT attractions

Despite the name, the 11th annual Atlanta Jewish Film Festival is no more restricted to Jews than it is to Atlantans. The diverse programming offers something for everyone, including LGBT viewers.

There are many fine films among the 57 features and nine shorts in this year’s festival, unspooling Feb. 8-27 at six venues, primarily the Regal Atlantic Station and Lefont Sandy Springs.

Documentaries in the festival reveal that famous children’s story writer Maurice Sendak (“Tell Them Anything You Want”) is gay but the world’s most famous hairdresser (“Vidal Sassoon: The Movie”) isn’t.