5 LGBT things you need to know today, July 17

1. “I have a song called 'Just A Wee Bit Gay.' It's a great little dance tune.” Dolly Parton is planning on doing an LGBT-friendly dance album. 2. “KFC is old and not expanding. Chick-fil-A is newer and comi...

Take that, Chick-fil-A [VIDEO]

YUM. Food and politics to feed your bellies. Brand new Leghorn Chicken in Chicago is serving up tasty food while also sticking it to Atlanta-based Chick-fil-A with its political slant. “We donate 2 percen...
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Um, of course it was political to get Chick-fil-A kicked off Emory’s campus

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There will soon be no Chick-fil-A on the campus of Emory University and the student newspaper the Emory Wheel is pleased as sweet iced tea ― regardless of how the decision was made.

FACE, or the Food Advisory Committee Emory, said it decided the controversial food chain based in Atlanta would not be back for another year in Cox Hall because, well, students didn't like it. They just weren't eating there that much. The decision has nothing to do with the controversy surrounding the gay-marriage-hating Dan Cathy and his family's Atlanta-based restaurant, nor the boycott organized by Emory students ― that perhaps led to few students eating there, right?

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Campus newspaper: Chick-fil-A to leave Emory University

chickfila tweet

The Chick-fil-A restaurant on Emory University's Atlanta campus, the target of protests due to the company's anti-gay stands, will be removed this summer, the college newspaper reported today via Twitter.

"Chick-fil-A to be removed from Cox Hall this summer as part of FACE's new Cox Hall layout," tweeted the Emory Wheel, the independent campus newspaper.

After controversy over Chick-fil-A heated up last summer, following Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy bragging to a Christian media outlet that his company was “guilty as charged” in opposing gay marriage, Emory's LGBT alumni group, GALA, sent a letter Aug. 23 to Emory President James Wagner raising concerns about the company’s millions in donations to groups that oppose LGBT rights.

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Emory students, alumni still want Chick-fil-A kicked off campus

Shane Windmeyer and Dan Cathy

LGBT alumni and students at Atlanta’s Emory University won’t back down from their call to kick Chick-fil-A out of campus dining, despite a national gay activist’s revelation that he has formed a friendship with Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy.

Shane Windmeyer, executive director of national group Campus Pride, drew headlines with his Jan. 28 column posted on Huffington Post, “Dan and Me: My Coming Out as a Friend of Dan Cathy and Chick-fil-A.”

Windmeyer wrote that “after months of personal phone calls, text messages and in-person meetings,” including attending the Chick-fil-A bowl with Cathy on New Year’s Eve in Atlanta, he now considers Cathy a friend.

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LGBT Campus Pride ED says Chick-fil-A tax forms show no donations to ‘most divisive’ anti-gay groups

Chick-fil-A protest

Atlanta-based fast food chain Chick-fil-A found itself in a world of controversy last year after reports surfaced that the company was funding anti-gay groups like Exodus International and Focus on the Family through the company's WinShape Foundation.

The controversy was only heightened when the company's President and COO Dan Cathy said Chick-fil-A was “guilty as charged” in opposing same-sex marriage rights. Cathy's comments sparked protests, counterprotests and a series of boycotts by LGBT activists.

But a new first-person column published today by Campus Pride Executive Director Shane Windmeyer suggests that the chicken chain's WinShape Foundation has suspended donations to groups that advocate against same-sex marriage rights.

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Top local news of 2012: Atlanta backs marriage

Alex Wan and Kasim Reed

Whether it was the threat of the end of the world or just plain old fashioned holiday spirit — or most likely political timing — the month of December brought Atlanta officials together in a cornucopia of outspoken support for LGBT equality. 

First, on Dec. 3, the Atlanta City Council passed a resolution 11-2 stating its support for same-sex marriage. The resolution was introduced by Alex Wan, the only openly gay council member, after months of discussion with his colleagues about the difference between civil unions and marriage equality.

Wan, who represents District 6, said he pushed for the resolution because it was “the right thing to do.”

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Outspoken: 2012 in quotes

Barack Obama

From President Obama coming out in support of marriage equality to celebrities like Anderson Cooper just plain coming out, 2012 provided plenty of notable quotables.

Here is a look back at some of the most memorable LGBT media moments of the year.

OBAMA SAYS ‘I DO’

“I am absolutely comfortable with the fact that men marrying men, women marrying women, and heterosexual men and women marrying another are entitled to the same exact rights, all the civil rights, all the civil liberties. And quite frankly, I don’t see much of a distinction beyond that.”

— Vice President Joe Biden on Meet the Press, touching off debate over whether he had gone beyond President Obama, who did not support gay marriage but has said his views are “evolving.” (Meet the Press, May 6)