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Lost-n-Found aims to raise $1 million to open new shelter

Lost-N-Found fundraiser

Lost-n-Found Youth hopes to raise $1 million by October 2014 to meet the needs of hundreds of Atlanta homeless LGBT youth seeking permanent housing.

The capital campaign was announced May 17 at Jungle. The club’s dance floor, typically filled with shirtless men dancing to popular DJs, was instead covered with trash, makeshift shelters and a snack table with garbage can lids used to hold the food as a way to show attendees how homeless people live.

Along one wall were large pieces of cardboard explaining the needs to meet in the next year to help more LGBT homeless. Those needs include opening a thrift store that would bring in a constant source of income, a drop in center and, eventually, a new transitional living center.

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Atlanta Cotillion’s ‘Cirque de Nuit’ brings big changes to drag fundraising tradition

Atlanta Cotillion

Now in its 12th year, Atlanta Cotillion is turning its old fundraising format on its crown.

The group has ditched the drag debutantes, tiaras and season-ending black-tie ball in favor of year-round team fundraising and a more inclusive annual bash to raise money for its longtime beneficiary, AID Atlanta.

In January 2013, event chair Darrell Burke, former chair John McGuirk and several past debs decided on an all-new format that kicks off with the group's "Cirque de Nuit," an avant-garde ball June 8 in the Historic Hangar of the Delta Heritage Museum.

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The race toward equality

HRC Athletes for Equality

The sports world is still waiting for the first out professional gay male athlete, despite much poking and prodding from gay and lesbian sports fans. Women’s professional sports have featured several openly lesbian and bisexual athletes, from soccer star Megan Rapinoe to women’s basketball icon Sheryl Swoopes.

But gay men, especially in the country’s five largest sporting leagues — National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball, National Football League, Major League Soccer and National Hockey League — have been reluctant to come out of the closet during their careers. Sure, there are some high-profile allies, like NFL players Chris Kluwe and Brandon Ayanbadejo, but we’re still waiting for an open, active professional male athlete.

The Human Rights Campaign hopes to change the environment in which players can come out with a new campaign called Athletes for Equality, which engages LGBT and straight athletes while raising money for the national LGBT rights organization.

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‘Drop the Soap’ raises $7,000 for Team Friendly Atlanta

Team Friendly Atlanta at Jungle

Team Friendly Atlanta, a group dedicated to reducing HIV stigma, held its launch party and a fundraiser at Jungle on Saturday, March 16. Participants bid to get people "dirty" and then bid to clean them off. And it was a sexy night for many of the guys, and two women, who were willing to auctioned off for charity. Those who were auctioned off included HIV activist and former Mr. Atlanta Eagle Chandler Bearden, Mark Gordon aka DJ Diablo Rojo, porn star Charlie Harding, aerialist Melissa Coffey, SirBen and Joeboy, leatherboy Dana Prosser and Lizzy Fountain, organizer for the "Dirty Boys" calendar.

Pamm Burdett of the Lloyd E. Russell Foundation donated $1,000 to have Bearden glitterbombed — and this Atlanta Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence chipped in $50 each to also have the pleasure of pouring glitter on him. It's probably safe to say he will be picking off glitter for years to come.

Team Friendly t-shirts were on sale and donations of male hygiene products were also being collected to donate to Lost-n-Found Youth, an organization that has served some 150 homeless LGBT youth in metro Atlanta. Eight of those young people have tested positive for HIV, according to Rick Westbrook, founder of Lost-n-Found.