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Atlanta LGBT activists speak out against HB 87 for Saturday’s ‘March for Justice’

A queer contingent participated in Saturday's March for Justice to protest Georgia's immigration law that went into effect July 1.

Before the march, several members of Atlanta's gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender communities released statements saying why the oppose the law, HB 87 and titled the "Illegal Immigration Reform and Enforcement Act of 2011."

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Gay and Latino in Georgia

Georgia latinos work against new immigration law

Emir Palacios is 17, a senior at Lithia Springs High School and hopes to go to college to study criminal justice or fashion design or maybe become a Spanish teacher.

He is also gay and moved with his family to the U.S. in 1997 from Acapulco, Guerrero Mexico, when Palacios was three. The family first moved to California then to Atlanta to find work.

Palacios and his family are among those affected by HB 87, Georgia’s new law set to go into effect July 1 and titled the “Illegal Immigration Reform and Enforcement Act of 2011.”

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Religion blog: Our moral responsibility to reject HB 87

In the last few days, I've been asked why we should sign on with the Somos Georgia / We Are Georgia’s BuySpot & Sanctuary Zone Community a dozen times if I've been asked once.

The answer is pretty simple. As Christians, as persons of deep faith, we have an obligation to stand up and say no. The truth is that this law, HB 87 "Georgia Illegal Immigration Reform and Enforcement Act" is probably not Constitutional and most certainly not morally correct.

Rev. Richard Nathan, pastor of Columbus Vineyard Church, made the point a while back when he wrote: