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Atlanta Pride celebrates 40 years

On a hot summer night some 41 years ago, a ragtag group of gay street youth, drag queens, dykes and transgender people fought back against a police raid at New York City’s Stonewall Inn.

The June 1969 uprising is widely viewed as launching the modern gay rights movement, igniting a more radical approach than the fledgling “homophile” movement that was already quietly underway.

By the next year, cities began hosting rallies and celebrations to mark the anniversary of Stonewall, creating the Gay Pride events that continue to this day.

Atlanta held its first Pride march in 1971, when about 100 brave souls marched down Peachtree Street, and celebrates its 40th anniversary in 2010.

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New film ‘Stonewall Uprising’ revisits LGBT milestone

Stonewall Riots

Georgia native David Carter is the author of “Stonewall: The Riots that Sparked the Gay Revolution,” the meticulously researched 2004 book on which the film “Stonewall Uprising” is based.

As this weekend marks 41 years since Stonewall, and 40 years since the first Gay Pride celebrations, we caught up with Carter — who now lives in New York City — to discuss his role in making the film, the myths that still surround the riots, and what we can still learn from Stonewall today.

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‘Stonewall Uprising’ explores turning point in LGBT history

“Before Stonewall” ended with the Stonewall Riots. “After Stonewall” began with them. Those documentaries from 1984 and 1999 respectively were reissued in a two-DVD set for Pride Month.

“Stonewall Uprising” sounds like it might have been called “During Stonewall,” but an opening title reveals the scarcity of photos and film footage of the actual events. Instead the new documentary uses reenactments and generic materials from the period, in addition to interviews with those involved.

Based in part on David Carter’s book “Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution” (with Carter helping vet the interviewees), “Stonewall Uprising” is mostly a variation on “Before Stonewall.” Except for a brief introduction the June 28, 1969, raid that triggers the riots doesn’t occur until 50 minutes into the film. The last half-hour is about the raid, the riots and the aftermath.

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New print edition hits stands on today

Country music’s evolution from redneck to rainbow, Pride celebrations around Georgia, gay baiting in the governor’s race — all this and more in the June 11 issue.

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Atlanta Pride announces Stonewall Week events

The Atlanta Pride Committee is kicking off the 2010 Pride season by announcing its events for Stonewall Week. Held from June 19-26, Stonewall Week centers on the anniversary of the infamous Stonewall raid and riots which took place in New York in late June 1969.

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Atlanta’s Stonewall?

The Eagle raid has been compared to the 1969 police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a New York City gay bar, that is credited with sparking the modern gay rights movement.
How do the two raids really stack up? We asked Scott Titshaw, professor at Mercer University School of Law, who teaches “Sexual Orientation and the Law.”