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The 5 best (and by ‘best,’ we mean worst) Ga. Republican quotes on LGBT issues

Georgia GOP Chair Sue "Free Ride" Everhart isn't the only Republican in the state to spout off ridiculous nonsense about LGBT people. We hesitate to post this list today, lest you think these quotes are an April Fool's Day joke. But no, Georgia conservatives actually said all of these outrageously offensive, painfully stupid things about gay people.

Here are the five of the dumbest things prominent Georgia conservatives have publicly said about LGBT issues, culled just from the last three years of GA Voice coverage.

The Marietta Daily Journal deserves credit for first publishing several of these, a dubious honor for the city in Cobb County, which approved the infamous 1993 resolution declaring homosexuality incompatible with community standards — prompting protests that ultimately cost Cobb the chance to host events in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics.

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AJC looks back at those on front lines of Ga. same-sex marriage fight

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The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has a good story that was posted late Tuesday night titled "As Supreme Court weighs same-sex marriage, Georgians in 2004 battle look forward."

What we learned from the story:

• Jeff Graham, now executive director of Georgia Equality, said in 2004 Georgia LGBT activists didn't take the right approach when taking their message to voters.

"We didn’t begin to change people’s minds (with) the big politics; it’s about the simple message of wanting to take care of the person you love,” he said. “Once we stopped being afraid to talk about that fact … that’s when the public attitudes about this started to change.”

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Ga. LGBT job bill looks to be revived next year under Gold Dome

A bill that would prohibit state employees from being fired because they are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender never got out of a Judiciary Committee subcommittee this year in the Georgia legislature, but plans are to continue garnering support to have it passed in a future session.

When the State Fair Employment Practices Act, HB 630, was first introduced at the end of last year's session by state Rep. Karla Drenner (D-Atlanta), activists planned for the bill to take perhaps several sessions before it would get passed, said Georgia Equality Executive Director Jeff Graham.