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Red carpet stylist Brad Goreski unveils a new book, and possibly a new brand of Bravolebrity

Brad Goreski

The Bravo network’s roster of reality programming, including the “Real Housewives” franchise, Tabatha Coffey’s takeover series, and “Millionaire Matchmaker,” has become so ubiquitous that it’s coined its own term: Bravolebrity. The network embraced this image wholeheartedly, launching a promotional campaign depicting its reality menagerie at summer camp together, with a solid emphasis on the “camp.”

Critics hold the Bravolebrity up as the prime example of “famous for being famous,” as the casual viewer would struggle to identify what most of these people actually do for a living. They have job titles most of us never encounter in real life: Fashionista. Lifestyle expert. Home staging consultant.

Too often, they are more clearly defined by their general lack of self-awareness, and a tendency toward throwing drinks in faces or overturning tables at the slightest provocation.

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Why ‘Downton Abbey’ is history’s gayest British export

Downton Abbey

I don't like to take a lot of advice from my Twitter friends, but when the right combination of folks hashtag things I've never heard of, I get the feeling I'm missing the boat.

And this time, it was a boat straight to English gay hell: "Downton Abbey."

I recognized Maggie Smith's cold blank stare on ads oddly running on MARTA buses and the occasional stops along my Midtown route to work. It was her and two other fancy white ladies in period costumes. As if you'd see Maggie Smith doing anything else.

"What's this DownTOWN Abbey stuff I keep seeing?" I asked by boyfriend.

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Bravo’s Brad and Gary are a surprising pair of accidental role models

Brad World

I've been openly gay for nine years, living in Atlanta for almost seven and recently met a pretty cool dude I enjoy spending time with.

This gay thing is old hat by now.

There are gay people on television everywhere. I try to stay away from most of them, but I was caught off guard the other night when Bravo's "It's a Brad, Brad World" happened to follow one of my must-watch TV shows, "The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills."

In this particular episode, our protagonist Brad Goreski, a 30-something fashion stylist launching his own company after parting ways with his reality TV mentor Rachel Zoe, is whisked away to Milan for men's fashion week.

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‘Smash’ focuses on competitive, very gay New York theater world

NBC's new show 'Smash'

Featuring a number of openly gay producers and execs, including David Marshall Grant, the new musical TV series “Smash” aims to be just that when it premieres next week. The series debuts at 10 p.m. Feb. 6 on NBC.

Set in the world of Broadway theater, “Smash” stars Debra Messing as Julia, half of a songwriting team who is in now in the process of adopting a child. When her colleague Tom (Christian Borle) talks to her about staging a new musical based on the life of Marilyn Monroe, the idea of writing a hit show leads Julia back to the work grind she thought she had put behind her.

As auditions for the Marilyn musical unfold, the top two candidates for the lead role become newcomer Karen Cartwright (Katherine McPhee), fresh from the Midwest, and Ivy Bell (Megan Hilty), who looks the part and seems a shoo-in for the role. As the season progresses, the producers try to decide which of the two gets the role.

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Culture club: The year’s biggest LGBT media moments

The year's top media stories

Chaz Bono danced with the stars, Lady Gaga spoke out after a “Little Monster” committed suicide, a gay teen’s video went viral when he defended his two moms to the Iowa legislature, and gay characters went all the way on “Glee.”

LGBT individuals and issues were everywhere in the media this year. Here are some of the biggest moments from social media, television, music, movies and theater.