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Georgia Aquarium: Actress Jane Lynch given ‘inaccurate and distorted information’

Jane Lynch at the Georgia Aquarium

Officials from the Georgia Aquarium today disputed “Glee” actress Jane Lynch's claim that the annual Atlanta Pride Kickoff party held at the aquarium is harmful to animals, noting that the lesbian actress had praised the facility in the past.

“I must say that we were quite surprised, as we think of Ms. Lynch as a friend of Georgia Aquarium,” Scott Higley, vice president of marketing and communications of the Georgia Aquarium, told GA Voice.

“She visited our facility with her family in the summer of 2011 [pictured above] and subsequently gave us glowing comments about her visit, after she was able to witness first-hand the quality of care we dedicate to the animals here at Georgia Aquarium each and every day,” Higley said.

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Fall Preview: Gay is the ‘New Normal’

The New Normal on NBC

It’s been 14 years since NBC launched “Will & Grace,” heralded as the first successful network sitcom to debut with an openly gay lead character. The title of NBC’s new gay-themed sitcom sums up the progress since then — in the world of entertainment, gay is now “The New Normal.”

The show, which debuted Sept. 11 and will air at 9:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, is about a gay couple who hires a surrogate to have a baby. Openly gay Andrew Rannells and Ellen Barkin head the cast, which also features “Real Housewives of Atlanta” star NeNe Leaks.

“The New Normal” was created by openly gay Ryan Murphy of “Glee” fame. It’s based on Murphy’s desire to have a child with his own partner.

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Red carpet stylist Brad Goreski unveils a new book, and possibly a new brand of Bravolebrity

Brad Goreski

The Bravo network’s roster of reality programming, including the “Real Housewives” franchise, Tabatha Coffey’s takeover series, and “Millionaire Matchmaker,” has become so ubiquitous that it’s coined its own term: Bravolebrity. The network embraced this image wholeheartedly, launching a promotional campaign depicting its reality menagerie at summer camp together, with a solid emphasis on the “camp.”

Critics hold the Bravolebrity up as the prime example of “famous for being famous,” as the casual viewer would struggle to identify what most of these people actually do for a living. They have job titles most of us never encounter in real life: Fashionista. Lifestyle expert. Home staging consultant.

Too often, they are more clearly defined by their general lack of self-awareness, and a tendency toward throwing drinks in faces or overturning tables at the slightest provocation.