5 LGBT things you need to know today, June 15

1. “While the precise motivation for the rampage remains unclear, it is evident that Mr. Mateen was driven by hatred toward gays and lesbians. Hate crimes don’t happen in a vacuum. They occur where bigotry is a...
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Atlanta marks Transgender Day of Remembrance

Transgender Day of Remembrance vigil at state capitol

Participants in the annual Atlanta Transgender Day of Remembrance read 222 names and instances of transgender people around the world killed violently for who they are. At the conclusion of the Nov. 20 vigil on the steps of the state capitol, groups of red balloons were released into the sky, representing the blood of those violently attacked and killed in 2011.

Sir Jesse Beller, a DeKalb County teacher and trans activist who works with the Georgia Safe Schools Coalition, played “Taps” on his trumpet to remember the dead.

Organized by Tracee McDaniel, founder and CEO of the Juxtaposed Center for Transformation, and supported by numerous organizations including Lambda Legal, Georgia Equality, the Human Rights Campaign and Meak Productions, the annual event attracted some 100 people this year.

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Annual Transgender Day of Remembrance memorializes those lost to violence, bias

Transgender Day of Remembrance

As dozens gather on the steps of Georgia Capitol each Nov. 20, names are read aloud, each followed by a single chime of a bell ringing out into the cold night.

The gathering is the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance vigil, and the names are of transgender people who have died due to violence or discrimination. The bell is a stark reminder that some people want others who are “different” to be forgotten. Forever.

“This is the most emotional part of the vigil to me,” says Tracee McDaniel, founder and executive director of the Juxtaposed Center for Transformation, Inc., and organizer of Atlanta’s Transgender Day of Remembrance.

“These people are deceased. We memorialize those individuals by reciting their names — their families don’t want to remember them, others don’t want to remember them. We are making sure their names and their memories are remembered,” McDaniel says.

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Religion blog: May we not forget

Saturday is a day of mourning. It is not a day that is on the national calendar. In fact with the exception of a small percentage of people in this country this day of mourning will pass completely unnoticed.

Those who take a moment and remember on this day will find themselves swinging between tears of grief and deep waves of anger not to mention a certain amount of fear of further attacks.

The devastating images of those viciously killed in 2010 for simply trying to be themselves is something we should remember, something that should burn in our souls.

The people we mourn for this day are apart of the community most would just as soon not deal with. Oh we go to watch the drag shows and tell our jokes and we have added a “T” to the GLB_Q but still don’t take seriously enough that folks in the transgender community live in a very dangerous and un-supportive world.

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Atlanta lesbian involved in boating accident, missing

Fox 5 Atlanta reported late yesterday that Atlanta-resident Laura Zekoll went missing Saturday evening during a sailing trip after the boat she was on hit a reef in waters near the Bahamas.

According to Fox 5, Zekoll is a 46-year-old Atlanta resident.

The report states that the accident occurred near Avaco Island, which is part of the Bahamas. Four crew members boarded a lifeboat after the boat capsized, but the life raft was unable to support all four and each fell into the water. According to the article, three of the four made it to land and were eventually rescued.

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Atlanta candlelight vigil honors gay teens that have committed suicide

The Atlanta Chapter of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, known as the Order of the Flaming Sugarbakers, believe costumes and extravagance are a way to show their cheer for the queers. But it was a somber moment for the Sisters when they gathered Saturday at Ansley Mall to honor the several teens that have committed suicide allegedly due to anti-gay bullying.