Books

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Jonathan Lerner, a founder of the Weather Underground, explores politics, sexuality in new book

Weather Underground member Jonathan Lerner

When two hijacked planes crashed into the Twin Towers on Sept. 11, 2001, Atlanta writer Jonathan Lerner remembers thinking how he could identify with Mohamed Atta. Atta, a college-educated man who was raised by affluent parents in Egypt, was the hijacker-pilot who flew the first plane into the World Trade Center.

Lerner’s friend, sex columnist and blogger Michael Alvear, who is gay, told him he needed to put those thoughts down on paper.

So Lerner took a manuscript he had been trying to complete as a memoir about his days as a founding member of the Weather Underground and condensed it into 6,000 words for an essay published Feb. 24, 2002, in the Washington Post Magazine.

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‘Filth elder’ John Waters explores his ‘Role Models.’

Author and filmmaker John Waters

For more than 40 years, John Waters has been one of the most original voices in contemporary pop culture. His films, including “Pink Flamingos,” “Desperate Living,” “Polyester,” “Hairspray” and “Pecker,” brought the underground and independent creative spirit to mainstream audiences.

Waters is also the author of several books, including his latest, “Role Models,” released last month. In “Role Models,” Waters pays homage to the people, some famous, some not, who helped to make him who he is today.

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Foxy Brown at Outwrite

Actress Pam Grier will sign copies of her new book Foxy: My Life in Three Acts tonight at Outwrite

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‘Mama Deb’ finds happy ending to grim fairy tales

Debi Lowry is already a bit of a legend in gay Atlanta: a fixture on dance floors and at charitable fundraisers, a surrogate mother to the dozens of gay men who affectionately know her as Mama Deb. As much as Lowry revels in her popularity and being able to offer a compassionate shoulder to those who feel turned away from their biological families, she was unsatisfied by the thought of her legacy being limited to her being a social butterfly.

“When I’m gone, when I die, I want to have had an impact on someone else’s life — I don’t want it to be just, ‘Oh, she was a really nice person’ or ‘She made me laugh,’” Lowry says. “If I can change their lives for the better, I absolutely have to do that.”

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Yolo Akili’s poetry transcends sexual identity

Yolo Akili trancends sexual identity

Poet Yolo Akili’s new CD, “Purple Galaxy,” is a spoken-word meditation on transcending sexual identity. In it, he imagines an erotic utopia, free of shame and labels and driven by pure pleasure: