Books

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Lesbian author hits mainstream success with trilogy set on the streets of Atlanta

Amanda Kyle Williams

Amanda Kyle Williams typically begins writing her acclaimed mystery novels with a first scene and then a last scene.

“And then about 110,000 words in between,” she says.

Years after writing lesbian mysteries for Naiad, a small press, Williams has found mainstream success with a series set in Atlanta.

Conceived as a trilogy, the series centers around Keye Street, a Chinese-American former FBI profiler who was fired from her job due to alcoholism. Street now runs her own detective agency and does odd jobs while also consulting with the Atlanta Police Department on some of the more heinous crimes to hit the city.

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David Sedaris delivers more than laughs with ‘Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk’

An Evening with David Sedaris

If you haven’t read “Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk” yet, you are cheating yourself of an important moral guide for these troublesome times. Also, you’ll miss the opportunity to laugh so hard that you snort. How often can you get a two-for-one deal like this?

“Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk” is the most recent book by gay humorist David Sedaris, who brings his sardonic wit and intellectual humor to Atlanta Symphony Hall on Oct. 27.

“Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk” is a collection of 17 fables, little stories featuring animal characters illustrating some moral lesson, set in contemporary urban America.  You’re free to interpret them as taking place in New York City, but Atlanta, San Francisco, Chicago, or Miami would work just as well.

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Fall Preview: Make your LGBT reading list for fall

Books fall preview

Whether you prefer fiction, non-fiction, celebrities or even cookbooks, there are plenty of options to fill your fall LGBT reading list. Some are newly out this season, while others debuted earlier this year.

Novel thoughts

• Picking up where “Captain Harding’s Six-Day War” left off, the period gay romance “Captain Harding and His Men” (Lethe Press, 2012) by Atlanta author Elliott Mackle follows more of Harding’s “adventures and misadventures” in a military setting.

• Arriving on bookshelves around the same time that the similarly-themed NBC sitcom “The New Normal” makes its debut, Michael Lowenthal’s “The Paternity  Test” (University of Wisconsin Press, 2012) explores gay fatherhood and  surrogate motherhood.

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Charis welcomes gay author Eric Sasson tonight

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As a lesbian-owned feminist bookstore, Atlanta's Charis Books & More sometimes gets a bad rap for not showing the love for queer and progressive men. The fact is, the bookstore — the oldest feminist bookstore in the South — continually gives recognition to gay men and their works.

Tonight, Charis welcomes gay author Eric Sasson from Brooklyn, NY, to the store to read from his book, "Margins of Tolerance," the 2011 Tartt First Fiction Award runner-up. Sasson reads at the store from 7:30-9 p.m.

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Check out these new LGBT reads for hot summer days

Too hot to do anything but sit inside? These new offerings from LGBT writers will give you plenty to read whether in the midst of a heat wave, or if you’re lucky enough to be on the beach or by the pool.

Rocking and reeling

• Hal Leonards’s Music on Film series presents books about two movies close to queer readers’ hearts: “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” (Limelight Editions, 2012) by  Dave Thomson examines what is, to this day, still one of the gayest movie  music musicals of all time, cult or non-cult; and “Purple Rain” (Limelight  Editions, 2012) by John Kenneth Muir looks at Prince’s groundbreaking 1984  movie debut.

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‘Herself When She’s Missing’ author Sarah Terez Rosenblum visits Charis

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Sarah Terez Rosenblum's lives with a werewolf. But that's not what this article is about. This article is about her debut novel, "Herself When She's Missing" and her reading from that novel on Thursday, July 5, at Charis Books & More beginning at 7:30 p.m.

Some background on Rosenblum: her age is "younger than Jesus was when he died." She was born in Milwaukee, Wisc., and now lives in Chicago. She's cool with being referred to as lesbian or queer.

The bio from her website states: "A writer with an MFA in Creative Writing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Sarah Terez Rosenblum freelances for publications and sites including The Chicago Sun Times and Pop Matters. Her fiction has appeared in literary magazines such as “kill author” and “Underground Voices,” and she was a 2011 recipient of Carve Magazine's Esoteric Fiction Award. Her debut novel, "Herself When She's Missing" was published in June 2012 by Soft Skull Press. When not writing, Sarah supports herself as a figure model, Spinning Instructor and creative writing teacher at Chicago’s StoryStudio. Inevitably one day she will find herself lecturing naked on a spinning bike. She’s kind of looking forward to it, actually."

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Bravo’s media maven and ‘Talkative’ Andy Cohen coming to Atlanta

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Andy Cohen, the mastermind behind Bravo's "Real Housewives" franchise, series, hot mess — whatever you want to call the shows — as well as numerous other shows on the gayest network on TV will be in Atlanta on Wednesday to talk about his new book, "Most Talkative: Stories from the Front Lines of Pop Culture" at SCAD-Atlanta.

You can attend Cohen's appearance at SCAD-Atlanta for free with the purchase of the book at the door or $10 without the purchase of the book. The event is being sponsored by Inman Park's A Capella Books and SCAD-Atlanta's writing program at Ivy Hall. The event begins at 6:30 p.m. at the main campus of SCAD-Atlanta at 1600 Peachtree St. NE, Atlanta, GA 30309.

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Lesbian artist, author Alison Bechdel mines maternal relations in new graphic novel

Alison Bechdel

Alison Bechdel gained legions of fans with her syndicated comic strip “Dykes to Watch Out For,” known for its mix of personal relationships and political issues, before turning her pen to even more overtly personal topics.

Her celebrated first graphic novel, “Fun Home,” published in 2006, focused on Bechdel’s relationship with her father, including his gay affairs during his marriage to her mother. Now, Bechdel uses her formidable storytelling and illustration skills to explore her relationship with her mother in her new graphic memoir, “Are You My Mother?” GA Voice: Your previous book “Fun Home” plays a considerable role in your new book, “Are You My Mother?”

Were you prepared for reception that the first book received?

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Gay author Augusten Burroughs reads from new self-help book at SCAD

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Augusten Burroughs visits SCAD on Saturday to talk about his new self-help book with the very interesting title, "This is How: Proven Aid in Overcoming Shyness, Molestation, Fatness, Spinsterdom, Grief, Disease, Lushery, Decrepitude and More. For Young and Old Alike."

Creative Loafing has an interview with the gay author who first became famous with his memoir "Running with Scissors" and the tales of his very, very crazy and disturbed family.

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[Video] Author of ‘Mind-Blowing Sex’ for women comes to Charis on Friday

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Author and sex expert Diana Cage visits Charis Books & More in Atlanta on Friday, May 11, at 7:30 p.m. to read from and sign her new book, “Mind-Blowing Sex" A Woman's Guide.” Cage's other books include “Girl Meets Girl: A Dating Survival Guide,” “Box Lunch: The Layperson’s Guide to Cunnilingus,” “Bottoms Up: Writing About Sex,” and the groundbreaking “On Our Backs Guide to Lesbian Sex.”

She took a few minutes our of her busy schedule to talk to GA Voice about what exactly “mind-blowing” sex is, the research she put into it (her girlfriend didn't mind) and the importance of supporting Charis, the Southeast's oldest feminist bookstore.

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Adrienne Rich’s legacy

Lesbian poet Adrienne Rich

When I was a young college student in the mid-1980s, Adrienne Rich came to speak at the University of New Orleans. I was out, proud, and well-versed in gay and lesbian history and literature, thanks to Alan Robinson’s Faubourg Marigny Bookstore.

At UNO, a small core of faculty and students was pushing for a women’s studies minor, which meant I had the opportunity to study Rich’s writing. I accepted this as normal, not revolutionary.

Today, as a poet, essayist, and writing teacher, I wake alone, my partner headed to a foreign country where the very definition of revolution is up for debate, and open my e-mail to news from Marilyn Hacker. She writes: Adrienne Rich! what a loss. I can hardly believe it.