article placeholder

Pride: Dyke March unites women, allies

Dyke March

One of the most popular traditions at Atlanta Pride is the annual Dyke March, set for the afternoon of Saturday, October 13th. 

Long a favorite, the Dyke March is a demonstration of the visibility, the political value, and the passion of dykes and all women-identified women, according to Jamie Green-Fergerson, Atlanta Pride’s board of directors vice chair.

“We are a diverse group of marchers, and we march in solidarity with all those who struggle against sexism, homophobia, racism, xenophobia, classism, ableism, fatphobia, transphobia, ageism, and other forms of marginalization,” she said.

article placeholder

Pride: Community Health Expo includes HIV tests, wellness info

Yogaga

New to Atlanta Pride this year and bound to draw some interest as part of the Community Health Expo is YoGaga, scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 13, at 10 a.m. at the athletic fields at Piedmont Park.

It’s the brainchild of yoga instructor Neda Honarvar, who has started her own studio, Tough Love Yoga, in town. Earlier this year she decided she would like to bring her brand of yoga to more of an LGBT audience.

Honarvar and colleague Garrett Cockayne approached Pride earlier this season and the committee liked the idea.

article placeholder

Pride: Amy Ray is home for Sunday show

Amy Ray of the Indigo Girls

Hometown hero and Indigo Girl Amy Ray was chosen by Atlanta’s Pride committee to headline this year’s event. She will be finishing out the festival on Sunday, October 14. The GA Voice caught up with her to talk to her about her own coming out, being a gay musician and living in a conservative community.

GA Voice: Congratulations on headlining Atlanta Pride. How does it feel to be a part of this event in your own home town?

Amy: It’s awesome. It’s one of those things where I can’t express the level of love that I have for my city. I love that I can bring my band into my hometown and play a Pride show. It’s like having your best friend and you really want to share with them something that’s really important to you.

When did you realize that you were gay?

article placeholder

‘Raid of the Rainbow Lounge’ explores Texas gay bar controversy

Raid on the Rainbow Lounge

When police raided a Fort Worth, Texas, gay bar on June 28, 2009, it was just the beginning of angry City Council meetings, protests and rallies — and, eventually, healing and change.

“Raid of the Rainbow Lounge,” a documentary that chronicles what happened in Forth Worth following the police raid, premieres in Atlanta on Oct. 7 as part of Out on Film.

Director Robert Camina said he looks forward to bringing his film to Atlanta because of the similarities he sees in Texas raid and the one at the Atlanta Eagle, just 10 weeks later. Camina and Atlanta Eagle attorney Dan Grossman will join a panel discussion after the film.

article placeholder

Out on Film thrives after 25 years

out on film

World premieres, special guests and great lineups are just a few of the keys to the success of Out on Film, Atlanta’s LGBT film fest, which celebrates its silver anniversary this year Oct. 4-11.

“First and foremost, I’m glad we’re still around. So many festivals, especially gay and lesbian festivals, are now gone or have to take a break,” says Jim Farmer, festival director of Out on Film.

When Out on Film began in 1987, it was managed and produced by the Atlanta Film Fest. In 2008, the Atlanta Film Fest decided it was time to give Out on Film “back to the community,” Farmer explains.