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[Photos] Indigo Girl Amy Ray rocks hometown crowd at Atlanta Pride

Amy Ray of the Indigo Girls

Hometown favorite Amy Ray, best known as one half of the beloved folk duo Indigo Girls, brought her edgier solo show to the Atlanta Pride stage on Sunday evening.

Backed by the Butchies, Ray rocked through a set that opened with her striking “Rural Faggot” and closed with her mandolin-driven ode to standing up against religious hate, “Let it Ring.”

Ray spoke from the stage about the significance of playing Atlanta Pride and dedicated a song to her partner, Carrie. To hear more from Ray about her experience of coming out personally and in her music career, please read our full interview here.

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[Photos] Erasure’s Andy Bell brings star power to Pride’s Saturday stage

Andy Bell

Erasure front man Andy Bell closed out Atlanta Pride’s stage on Saturday evening, following British pop songstress Rita Ora, who already had the crowd packed to the stage and ready to dance.

Bell, who has also had a successful solo career, treated fans to a set of favorites including Erasure hits like  “Chains of Love.”

Appearing alone on stage, Bell began his set in suit jacket, then tossed it aside to dance and twirl in a sleeveless t-shirt. He also thanked his partner, who he is soon to marry, who was standing to the right of the stage during the show.

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Nephew of gay icon continues to spread message of equality, pride

Stuart Milk

As a field general during the earliest battles of the modern LGBT rights movement, Harvey Milk’s primary weapon was a red and white bullhorn. The Fanon Transistorized Megaphone became a part of Milk’s political combat uniform, used to rally an army of San Francisco queers, street kids and liberals against centuries-old oppression of homosexuals.

The iconic megaphone amplified Milk’s words so loudly that they still echo today, almost 35 years after Milk was killed for fighting on behalf of gay liberation.

Milk’s election to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors made him one of the first openly gay elected officials in America, but a conservative fellow lawmaker assassinated him in 1978. Now Milk has a new type of megaphone to make sure his message and spirit remain as boisterous as they were when he was riling up a rebellion in the streets of San Francisco during the 1970s.