Celebrating 44 years of Atlanta Pride and who we are

This year marks the 44th annual Atlanta Pride festival. And what a long, fabulous trip it’s been to get here. In 1968, when lesbians, gay men, drag queens and gender non-conformists fought back against a pol...
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Ga. LGBTQ Archives Project to preserve personal histories

Whether you have diaries, letters, books or political posters that offer a glimpse into Georgia’s LGBT history, archivists want you to know it’s all important and there are places to donate.

On May 19, numerous archivists and LGBT history advocates will get together at the Phillip Rush Center to discuss ways to let the public know that these items are important, and the donor doesn’t need to be famous.

“I think a lot of people think history is what famous people did,” said Hillery Rink, a member of the Georgia LGBTQ Archives Project. “But primary sources are the historians. People ask, ‘Why would someone be interested in my story?’ But it’s everyday people living their lives, particularly in the South, where we learn our history.”

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Atlanta Eagle celebrates 25 years — and end to long legal battles

The Atlanta Eagle celebrates 25 years and an end to lawsuits

The Atlanta Eagle is ready to party.

In April, the gay bar in Midtown celebrates its 25th anniversary with a barbecue, balloon drop and giveaways, as well as the annual Leather Pride event.

The entire month of April is also booked with numerous other parties each weekend, including the celebration of Richard Ramey and Robby Kelley owning the bar for 15 years and MondoHomo’s popular WigOut party and fundraiser.

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Gay readers respond (angrily) to Marietta columnist’s anti-gay op-ed

When syndicated conservative columnist Dick Yarbrough wrote an anti-gay rant last week in the Marietta Daily Journal mocking California's law requiring LGBT history be taught in schools,  gay readers decided to respond in kind.

Two things for sure — some don't like being called "Gay Blade" or take kindly to hoop skirts.

Yarbrough wrote in his July 13 column about a phone conversation he had with this fictional character he called "Gay Blade," a flaming liberal, who warned him that soon Georgia's public schools would have to teach kids about historical LGBT figures. Because, you see, California is now doing it. Of course, there's a group of social conservatives trying to get the law repealed.

Yarbrough retorted to his fictional "friend" this was ridiculous because the state's leaders have more important priorities.

"Besides, we have a lot of pride in Georgia's history and the last thing we need to know is that some guy we named a county for used to run around at night in hoop skirts," Yarbrough wrote.