National

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Supreme Court to rule Wednesday on marriage cases

Supreme Court of the United States

The U.S. Supreme Court will rule tomorrow on two cases that could shape the fight for marriage equality for years to come. Decisions will be released starting at 10 a.m. LGBT rights supporters will then gather at 5 p.m. at the corner of 10th Street and Piedmont Avenue.

“Regardless of what those decisions entail, this will be a historic date for the LGBT community and will have a great impact on the ongoing struggle for equality in Georgia and around the country,” rally organizers stated in an open letter announcing the gathering.

The corner of 10th and Piedmont is in the heart of Midtown, Atlanta's gay mecca, and has played host to similar rallies in the past.

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Iowan thrust into national spotlight after viral video brings ‘My Two Moms’ memoir to Atlanta

Zach Wahls

In January 2011, then 19-year old Zach Wahls spoke before the Iowa House Judiciary Committee ahead of a vote that would have repealed same-sex marriage in the state. A video of his speech was uploaded to YouTube that evening, and in the hours and days that followed, Wahls found himself thrust into the national gay rights debate.

Wahls has since worked on gay acceptance in the Boy Scouts of America and has toured the country, speaking to students in colleges and high schools. He's also written a New York Times bestseller, “My Two Moms,” which brings him to Atlanta for a June 27 reading at the Friends School, sponsored by Charis Books & More and Atlanta Pride.

GA Voice spoke with Wahls about growing up with two moms, his goals and aspirations for the future, and why it's important to put the toilet seat down.

More than marriage: 5 issues our community must address now

Taylor Alexander

Mary Anne Adams moved to Atlanta in 1988 and since that time she has seen Atlanta's LGBT scene change dramatically.

“One of the biggest changes that I have seen is the degree and level of outness from LGBTQ communities, both internally and externally. Despite the overt homophobia and ever-looming threats of violence, it’s been exhilarating to see young folks on MARTA and at public events showing their affection for each other and just being themselves,” she said.

A proliferation of queer campus groups and openly gay politicians serving in the state legislature are also signs of Georgia's progress, said Adams, who works in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University and as an organizer with ZAMI NOBLA (National Organization of Lesbians Aging).

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Historic gay marriage decisions expected by end of June

Atlanta DOMA protest

The U.S. Supreme Court will issue decisions this month that could change the fight for marriage equality for a generation or more.

The last scheduled session for the current Supreme Court term is June 24. At press time June 4, gay marriage supporters and opponents alike were anxiously watching the court for decisions that could impact marriage rights for same-sex couples in California and around the country.

Meanwhile, activists around the country are planning “Day of Decision” demonstrations, including a gathering scheduled for the corner of 10th Street and Piedmont Avenue in Atlanta.

“Regardless of what those decisions entail, this will be a historic date for the LGBT community and will have a great impact on the ongoing struggle for equality in Georgia and around the country,” reads an open letter to the LGBT community signed by leaders of eight local LGBT and LGBT-supportive organizations.

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Will stigma fade as major pro athletes come out?

Jason Collins

Angel McCoughtry, star player for the WNBA’s Atlanta Dream, sat at a table with reporters in the belly of Phillips Arena during the basketball team’s recent media day.

Reporters asked her about playing overseas, about how the former Louisville star felt about her college being represented in the NCAA championships (the men won the title and the women lost the championship game to University of Connecticut) and her predictions for the upcoming Dream season.

When asked if she knew any gay players, she laughed knowingly.

And then she said she doesn’t care if a player is gay or straight.

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Experts seek clues to how Supreme Court will rule next month

Ruth Bader Ginsberg

LGBT activists view U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as a likely vote for equal protection in the two pending major cases involving marriage for same-sex couples.

But mainstream media outlets recently jostled that confidence by noting that she continues to express the view that the landmark abortion rights decision, Roe v. Wade, went “too far too fast.”

If the court’s most veteran supporter of equal rights for women believes Roe moved “too far too fast,” could she be urging an incremental approach to another controversial issue – marriage for same-sex couples?

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Minnesota governor to sign marriage equality bill today

minnesota state capitol via governor office

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton is scheduled to sign a marriage equality bill into law today at 5 p.m. at the state capitol, making Minnesota the 12th state to allow same-sex couples to marry.

The legislation, approved by the state Senate yesterday, continues an unprecedented momentum toward marriage equality, with Minnesota being the sixth state to approve marriage equality in the past six months and the third to do so in the past two weeks.

Rhode Island’s legislature and governor approved a marriage equality law May 2. Delaware’s legislature and governor did so May 7.