article placeholder

Report: 1 million African-American people in U.S. identify as LGBT

A new report by the Williams Institute, a think tank of the UCLA School of Law, finds that there are 1 million black people who identify as LGBT and one of the states with the most black gay couples includes Georgia.

The 1 million figure accounts for 3.7 percent of African American adults, according to the report titled, "LGBT African-American Individuals and African-American Same-Sex Couples."

There are an estimated 84,000 African American people in same-sex relationships with 25 percent of that number living in Georgia, New York, North Carolina and Maryland, the report states.

article placeholder

‘Pause’ to check out this steamy trailer from AID Atlanta’s Evolution Project

images/stories/3-4-13/pausetrailer.jpg

Talk about sexy. In less than 20 seconds the folks at AID Atlanta's Evolution Project and Eight Peace Productions have spliced together several steamy scenes between two men that will definitely leave you wanting to know more.

The trailer is for a short film titled "Pause" to premiere on YouTube on March 13 at 6 p.m. It "tells four intertwining tales of connection, sex and decisions."

article placeholder

Atlanta Black Gay Pride leadership names new president

images/stories/11-2-12/raymonddukes.jpg

In the Life Atlanta, the non-profit organizer of the annual Black Gay Pride celebration, announced today a new president is stepping in to take over the reins of leading the organization.

Raymond Duke, who became president of ITLA in 2008, is stepping down from his post. The new president is Rickie Smith.

Rickie Smith

"While I will miss so many things about the role and responsibility of organizational leadership, I have built life changing relationships that I will cherish forever," Duke said in a prepared statement.

article placeholder

State of Black Gay America Summit seeks to inspire change through ‘collective power’

images/stories/9-4-12/jeshawnnaclock.jpg

The sixth annual State of Black Gay America Summit over Labor Day weekend covered a broad range of topics over the course of the day on Sept. 1 — from HIV prevention medicines and the need for volunteers in vaccine research to the specifics of the Affordable Care Act to how much money does it cost to run an effective campaign in Atlanta and Georgia.

Keynote speaker Je-Shawna Wholley, a recent Spelman graduate who now lives in Washington, D.C., and is a senior fellow at the National Black Justice Coalition, tackled the subject of this year's theme at the summit at the Melia Hotel. "Embracing Our Collective Power to Influence Change" must be made by building coalitions and being sincere in the work people do, Wholley said.