Ryan Lee: The flattering theft of black gay culture

Bert and Ernie have some new company in the Queer Muppet Suite following the re- cent outing of Kermit the Frog. Miss Piggy must be in full-bore rampage mode—but that’s none of my business. *Sip* Sesame S...
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Bravo’s media maven and ‘Talkative’ Andy Cohen coming to Atlanta

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Andy Cohen, the mastermind behind Bravo's "Real Housewives" franchise, series, hot mess — whatever you want to call the shows — as well as numerous other shows on the gayest network on TV will be in Atlanta on Wednesday to talk about his new book, "Most Talkative: Stories from the Front Lines of Pop Culture" at SCAD-Atlanta.

You can attend Cohen's appearance at SCAD-Atlanta for free with the purchase of the book at the door or $10 without the purchase of the book. The event is being sponsored by Inman Park's A Capella Books and SCAD-Atlanta's writing program at Ivy Hall. The event begins at 6:30 p.m. at the main campus of SCAD-Atlanta at 1600 Peachtree St. NE, Atlanta, GA 30309.

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[Video] Bravo’s ‘Tabatha Takes Over’ makes over Atlanta salon and gay manager gets, uh, schooled

Tabatha Coffey is known for her no-nonsense approach to business especially when it comes to making over a salon that is simply going down the drain along with color and clippings.

In the March 20 episode of Bravo's hit show "Tabatha Takes Over," the dominatrix of deep-conditioning  visits Sweetgrass Salon located in the hippy neighborhood of Little Five Points.

The episode prominently features openly gay manager Brian Baj, who Tabatha doesn't take kindly to, including calling him a "shit stirrer" and "annoying." He says she is a real bitch. She says he has a lot of aggression. He stresses she is a real bitch. She calls him a "fuckweed." (The F-word is bleeped, but we can read lips.)

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Red carpet stylist Brad Goreski unveils a new book, and possibly a new brand of Bravolebrity

Brad Goreski

The Bravo network’s roster of reality programming, including the “Real Housewives” franchise, Tabatha Coffey’s takeover series, and “Millionaire Matchmaker,” has become so ubiquitous that it’s coined its own term: Bravolebrity. The network embraced this image wholeheartedly, launching a promotional campaign depicting its reality menagerie at summer camp together, with a solid emphasis on the “camp.”

Critics hold the Bravolebrity up as the prime example of “famous for being famous,” as the casual viewer would struggle to identify what most of these people actually do for a living. They have job titles most of us never encounter in real life: Fashionista. Lifestyle expert. Home staging consultant.

Too often, they are more clearly defined by their general lack of self-awareness, and a tendency toward throwing drinks in faces or overturning tables at the slightest provocation.