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Savannah’s historic Queer Power March and Pride fest attract hundreds

2010 Savannah Pride festival and Queer Power March

Savannah’s first Queer Power March made history with hundreds of people marching down the streets in the city’s historic district, chanting and holding signs seeking marriage equality, the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” and domestic partner benefits for Savannah city employees.

Organized by Jesse Morgan, who was a volunteer for Atlanta’s MondoHomo annual fest, and Laura Cahill, the march on Sept. 10 attracted a diverse crowd of people — there were a couple on motorcycles, many people on bicycles, and most walking down the streets as tourists took photos and employees of shops along the route stood outside and cheered. There were young children, elderly men, and several families as well.

The march began in Johnson Square, the city’s oldest, most historic square, and ended at Ellis Square where a rally with several speakers was held.

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[Video] Savannah Pride’s Queer Power March

Hundreds of LGBT persons and their allies gathered in downtown Savannah last weekend for the city’s Pride festival.

The Queer Power March was organized by Jesse Morgan and Laura Cahill and was the first LGBT march in Savannah's history. The march was held Friday, Sept. 10, and Pride was held on Saturday, Sept. 11.

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Savannah Pride, historic queer march seek to unify

Activist Derrick Martin

Savannah is set to make history on Sept. 10 when it holds its first Queer Power March, an event gay organizer Jesse Morgan calls “queerlicious.”

“Savannah has never seen anything like this before,” he said. “It’s time for Savannah to have a march. We want to show Savannah we are a large force.”

While Savannah will hold its 11th annual Pride festival the day after the march, on Sept. 11, the city has never had an LGBT march through the streets, Morgan said. Morgan helped organize Savannah’s largest LGBT equal rights rally that attracted some 400 people in May to coincide with the late gay activist Harvey Milk’s birthday.

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GA Spotlight: Project LifeVest

In April, Derrick Martin, a gay teen from Cochran, Ga., was asked to leave home after publicity surrounding his decision to take his boyfriend to the high school prom. On July 12, Martin launched Project LifeVEST to help other LGBT people in similar situations.

States the new group’s website: “Our mission is simple: ‘To be a helping hand, a life vest, to as many LGBTQ teens and adults as possible. We will carry out this mission through the establishment of safe places in as many cities as possible; through opening a call center with a qualified and well-educated and experienced team of counselors who can give advice and guidance where needed; through finding qualified and screened families who can, if the need arises, host rejected teens while they finish schooling or find a new place.’”

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Best of Atlanta: Outside of Atlanta

After two months of online balloting and more than 20,000 votes cast, we present the best of the best — our inaugural Best of Atlanta winners.

It all started back at the beginning of May, when we asked you, our readers, to nominate your favorites for dozens of awards in the categories of Community, People, Nightlife, Dining, Retail, Pet Services, Internet, and Outside Atlanta.

The top three finalists — or more, in the case of a tie — in each category made it through to the next round of voting. For the month of June, a multiple-choice ballot asked you to pick among the finalists for who really represents the finest in LGBT Georgia.

Thanks to everyone who voted, and congratulations to all of the worthy winners and runners up.