article placeholder

Adm. Mullen: Repealing ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ comes down to ‘integrity’

Last night the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, appeared on Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.”

Among the many topics discussed, Mullen addressed the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

"People give me a great deal of credit for this," Mullen said. "It really was, from my perspective, an integrity issue. Our military is an institution that has integrity as a value. I'm delighted that the law has changed."

article placeholder

White House: President to sign ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ repeal Wednesday

White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said today that President Barack Obama will sign the recently passed Don’t Act, Don’t Tell Repeal Act of 2010 into law this coming Wednesday, Dec. 22., according to USA Today.

Gibbs also said that the White House has discussed hosting a news conference after Congress adjourns for its Christmas break Wednesday morning and would include a formal signing then.

According to the article, the White House and the Pentagon are currently investigating “implementation and legal issues” of repeal. Once repeal is signed into law, the president, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates would need to certify the policy could be lifted without adverse effect to the military.

article placeholder

By the numbers: ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

71

Percent of military service members who said allowing gays to serve openly would have no impact on military readiness.

57

Percent of military service members who said allowing gays to serve openly would have no impact on their morale.

54

Percent of military service members who said allowing gays to serve openly would have no impact on unit cohesion.

53

Percent of combat-deployed military service members who said allowing gays to serve openly would have no impact on effectiveness.

62

Percent of service members who said their military career plans would not change due to repeal.

article placeholder

DADT debate moves forward despite uncertain future

Sen. John McCain, Adm. Mike Mullen and Def. Sec. Robert Gates at a recent Senate hearing on

The Pentagon released its highly anticipated report on the military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy Nov. 30 and just two days later, the Senate Armed Services Committee held a two-day hearing on the report’s findings.

The report found that as much as 70 percent of service members would consider allowing openly gay and lesbian soldiers to be “positive” or have “no impact” on morale and unit cohesion.

Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen and Gen. Carter Ham, who co-chaired the Pentagon’s Working Group on the report, testified on the first day of the hearing. All three said that Congress should act to repeal the policy during the current lame-duck session.

article placeholder

Senate Minority Leader doubts lame-duck ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ repeal

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) cast doubt on a lame-duck repeal of the military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy during an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

When asked by host David Gregory whether or not the Senate will vote to repeal the policy in light of a recent Pentagon report stating as much as 70 percent of military servicemembers believed repeal would be positive or have no impact on the military’s morale, McConnell said that he favored Sen. John McCain’s (R-Az.) view on the issue and would “follow his lead.”

“People are talking like that, that is the only issue,” McConnell said. “That defense bill also has abortions in military hospitals. Once you get on the defense bill, it typically takes two weeks.  I don't see how we can possibly finish the Defense Authorization Bill, a two-week bill, wholly aside from these controversial items that are in it — there are a whole lot of other things in it — before the end of the year.”