Halsey

5 LGBT things you need to know today, Jan. 22

1. Trailblazing stand-up comedian and writer Bob Smith, the first openly gay comic to appear on his own HBO comedy special and on "The Tonight Show" in 1994, passed away Saturday at the age of 59 after a long b...
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‘Legitimate rape’ lawmaker attempts to thwart military gays

Todd Akin

I just looked outside. The sky is not falling. And if you don't subscribe to the notion that the Mayans predicted the end of the world on Dec. 21, things appear to be chugging right along as they always have.

But if you asked outgoing U.S. Rep. Todd Akin (R-Mo.), the recent repeal of the military's “Don't Ask, Don't Tell” policy, in addition to recent marriage victories achieved in the last election, prove the world is surely in its last days.

You remember Akin. He's the guy that tried to justify his position on abortion by saying that women who are legitimately raped have a way of shutting down their body to prevent pregnancy. That statement caused him to lose any credibility in his race for U.S. Senate against incumbent Claire McCaskill.

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Obama issues statement on DADT repeal anniversary

Today marks the official one-year anniversary of the repeal of the discriminatory law barring gays and lesbians from openly serving in the United States armed services.

The law, known as “Don't Ask, Don't Tell,” was the basis for more than 13,000 military discharges from 1993 to 2011. It was signed into law by then-President Bill Clinton and was originally intended to keep the public and private lives of soldiers separate.

President Barack Obama commented today on the one-year anniversary by praising the armed services for adapting to the change in policy. Obama fulfilled a campaign promise by signing repeal into law.

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Out in the military: One year without ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

One year without DADT

On Sept. 20, the United States military will mark the one-year anniversary of the official repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the 1993 law that barred gays and lesbians from openly serving in the armed services. As the milestone nears, gay military members are thrilled to be able to be out, but note that inequities remain.

“During DADT, I did not ever hang out with other gays or even act on doing anything in fear of being caught so I waited until it was repealed to come out,” said Joshua Gravett, a gay Georgia native and sergeant in the U.S. Army currently stationed in Afghanistan.

Before repeal, Gravett — who enlisted at age 17 — planned to leave the Army. Now, he is considering completing the 20-year military career that would allow him to retire from the service at age 37.