article placeholder

Joan Baez on music, activism and kissing a girl

Joan Baez

Joan Baez. The name conjures images of a hippie-era folk musician who performed at the legendary Woodstock concert (while pregnant) and dated fellow musician Bob Dylan. Her renditions of songs like “Diamonds & Rust,” “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” and “We Shall Overcome” remain iconic to this day.

But Joan Baez, now 71, is still going strong. She just kicked off a tour this week and will have 10 special shows where she will perform with Atlanta’s own Indigo Girls, including shows at Atlanta’s Chastain Park Amphitheater June 14-15.

The concerts won’t be the first time Baez collaborated with Indigo Girls’ Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. The three have performed together since back in the early 1990s. They also recorded “Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright” together for Baez’ album “Ring Them Bells,” on which Baez also covered Indigo Girls’ “Welcome Me.”

article placeholder

Interview: Molly Ringwald dazzles with new CD and short stories

Molly Ringwald

The name Molly Ringwald will probably mean something different to you depending on how old you are. If you were a movie-going adolescent or adult in the early 1980s, Ringwald began making a strong impression on audiences in Paul Mazursky’s “Tempest,” followed by the double whammy of the late John Hughes’ “Sixteen Candles” and “The Breakfast Club,” not to mention “Pretty In Pink.” Other folks, who might have tuned in to “Different Strokes” and “The Facts of Life,” just prior to that, will remember her as Molly Parker on both shows.

Ringwald’s reign as the Queen of the Brat Pack ended by the late 1980s, although she continued to work regularly in film and on TV. In the late 2000s, following a second marriage and motherhood, Ringwald had a full-scale career comeback, including stints on Broadway and the TV series “The Secret Life of the American Teenager.” But there’s so much more to Ringwald than all that.

Ringwald is the author of two books, most recently the stellar “When It Happens To You: A Novel in Stories,” which came out in paperback May 7.

article placeholder

Grant Henry comes to Jesus

Grant Henry

About 25 years ago, Grant Henry had one of many come to Jesus moments.

And that moment led eventually to who he is now — owner of the popular bar, Church, located on Edgewood Avenue in the Old Fourth Ward.

It is at Church that Henry’s alter ego Sister Louisa hangs her hundreds of religious-themed paintings, while a mannequin dressed as a nun, representing Sister Louisa, swings from the ceiling with her junk peeking out of her underwear.

But back to the mid 1980s.