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Atlanta trans activist group donates canned goods to Saint Lost & Found

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Transgender Individuals Living Their Truth (TILTT) held its first canned food drive this year and donated its proceeds to the newly established Saint Lost & Found group.

TILTT, co-founded by Atlanta transgender activist Cheryl Courtney-Evans, is a local group with the mission of providing resources and support to transgender people, including assistance in finding jobs and housing. She said she hopes the canned good drive will be an annual event to help other local nonprofits in need.

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Person of the Year: Vandy Beth Glenn

Vandy Beth Glenn, GA Voice

After a day back at work under the Gold Dome, Vandy Beth Glenn sits down to talk. She pulls her boots off her feet and tucks her legs under her, maneuvering her body into a comfortable position.

“It’s been hard, really hard,” she said of the past four years in her legal fight to get her job back as a legislative editor at the Georgial General Assembly.

Fired in 2007 by then-Legislative Counsel Sewell Brumby for deciding to transition genders on the job, Glenn won her lawsuit against Brumby and the state this month when a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court’s ruling that Brumby, who retired in August, wrongly fired her. Glenn was represented by Lambda Legal.

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Transgender editor returns to work at Ga. legislature

Vandy Beth Glenn returns to work at Gold Dome

Vandy Beth Glenn returned to work Friday as a legislative editor at the Georgia General Assembly, just days after the a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court's ruling that the state violated her constitutional rights when she was fired after informing her employer she was transitioning from male to female.

Greg Nevins, the Lambda Legal attorney representing Glenn, confirmed this week that she reported back to work on Friday, Dec. 9. The 11th Circuit handed down its 3-0 ruling in favor of Glenn on Dec. 6. The federal appeals court ruling upheld U.S. District Judge Richard Story's ruling that Glenn was wrongly fired based on sex discrimination. Oral arguments before the 11th Circuit were held on Dec. 1.

Glenn also confirmed she is back at work.

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Vandy Beth Glenn may soon return to work at Ga. General Assembly

Vandy Beth Glenn and attorney Greg Nevins

A federal appeals court panel has upheld a lower court ruling that Vandy Beth Glenn was wrongly fired from her job as a legislative editor in the Georgia General Assembly after she informed her employer she planned to transition from male to female.

“The question here is whether discriminating against someone on the basis of his or her gender non-conformity constitutes sex-based discrimination under the Equal Protection Clause. …We hold that it does,” the three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled on Dec. 6, just five days after oral arguments were heard in the case.

Judge Rosemary Barkett wrote the opinion for the unanimous panel that included Judge William H. Pryor and Senior Judge Phyllis Kravitch.

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Appeals court panel rules for Ga. trans woman in job discrimination case

Vandy Beth Glenn wins appeal

A federal appeals court panel today upheld a lower court ruling that Georgia transgender woman Vandy Beth Glenn was illegally fired from her job as a legislative editor in the Georgia General Assembly after she informed her employer she planned to transition from male to female.

"The question here is whether discriminating against someone on the basis of his or her gender non-conformity constitutes sex-based discrimination under the Equal Protection Clause. …We hold that it does," the three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. Judge Rosemary Barkett wrote the opinion for the unanimous panel.

Read the story on oral arguments held before the 11th Circuit on Dec. 1 here.

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[Video] Federal appeals court offers hope in Ga. transgender woman’s job bias lawsuit

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Three judges sitting on the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals today appeared to side with transgender woman Vandy Beth Glenn, who was fired from her job as a legislative editor for the Georgia General Assembly after she informed her boss she was transitioning full-time to a woman.

"We have direct evidence of intentional discrimination," said Judge Bill Pryor.

Richard Sheinis, representing the state, argued that if Glenn was to win this case, transgender people would become a "protected class."

"That's right," Pryor and Judge Rosemary Barkett answered, almost simultaneously.

Pryor told Sheinis if he wanted to change the outcome, he should "go talk to Congress."

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Vandy Beth Glenn in court

U.S. Court of Appeals hears arguments in Ga. transgender woman's employment discrimination case today

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U.S. Court of Appeals to hear arguments in Ga. transgender woman’s employment discrimination case

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit will hear arguments in the federal discrimination lawsuit filed by a Georgia transgender woman who was fired from her state job after informing her employer she was transitioning from male to female.

Vandy Beth Glenn, represented by nonprofit LGBT legal organization Lambda Legal, sued the state of Georgia after she was fired in 2007 as a legislative editor for the Georgia General Assembly.

In July 2010 a federal judge ruled the state illegally discriminated against Glenn and in August the judge ordered she be reinstated back to her job. During the appeals process, however, Glenn has been receiving her 2007 salary but has not been able to return to her job.

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Annual Transgender Day of Remembrance memorializes those lost to violence, bias

Transgender Day of Remembrance

As dozens gather on the steps of Georgia Capitol each Nov. 20, names are read aloud, each followed by a single chime of a bell ringing out into the cold night.

The gathering is the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance vigil, and the names are of transgender people who have died due to violence or discrimination. The bell is a stark reminder that some people want others who are “different” to be forgotten. Forever.

“This is the most emotional part of the vigil to me,” says Tracee McDaniel, founder and executive director of the Juxtaposed Center for Transformation, Inc., and organizer of Atlanta’s Transgender Day of Remembrance.

“These people are deceased. We memorialize those individuals by reciting their names — their families don’t want to remember them, others don’t want to remember them. We are making sure their names and their memories are remembered,” McDaniel says.