5 LGBT things you need to know today, Sept. 17

1. Two Russian TV presenters have admitted to pranking Elton John by posing as Vladimir Putin on that phone call, inviting the singer to a Moscow Pride rally. 2. Speaking of pranks and Putin, a ...
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Ga. school drops efforts to recoup legal costs from ‘Bully’ parents

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Murray County's school district is dropping its legal effort to recoup some $30,000 in court costs from parents who sued the school after their son committed suicide, according to the Fulton County Daily Report.

The parents, Tina and David Long, unsuccessfully sued the school district, alleging the district was negligent in protecting their 17-year old son, Tyler, from consistent bullying by classmates and that the bullying led him to hang himself in 2009.

The Longs, however, had their lawsuit dismissed and recently the school district, located in Chatsworth, Ga., sought legal recourse to get back money spent defending the case in court.

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Ga. school sues parents of boy featured in ‘Bully’ documentary for $9K in court costs



The parents of Tyler Long, one of five young people featured in the critically acclaimed 2012 documentary "Bully," are being sued by the Murray County school district to recoup some $9,000 in court costs after the Longs' lawsuit against the school system was dismissed, according to a story in the Fulton Daily Report.

Murray County is in north Georgia, near Dalton.

Tina and David Long sued the Murray County Board of Education after their son, Tyler, 17, a student at Murray County High School in Chatsworth, Ga., committed suicide by hanging in 2009. The parents alleged in the lawsuit that school officials did nothing to stop the constant bullying their son endured, as portrayed in the film.

The lawsuit was filed in federal court on Jan. 29, 2010, and notes that Tyler had Asperger's Disorder. The lawsuit was dismissed last year by Judge Harold Murphy and appealed. The appeal was upheld in June.

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Two hearings on pro-gay bills cited as progress for conservative Gold Dome

Karla Drenner

As the Georgia General Assembly adjourned its annual 40-day session, the only specifically LGBT bill to pass this year was a resolution honoring the Atlanta Freedom Bands — and even that caused controversy.

Introduced by state Rep. Karla Drenner (D-Avondale Estates), one of three openly gay members of the General Assembly, the resolution was similar to those routinely passed every day to honor an organization or individual, with one exception.

“This bill had LGBT in there … I thought it was really innocuous,” Drenner said. “I worked on it to make it palatable for everybody and I removed everything that could be deemed to be inflammatory except LGBT.”